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Visiting the Library

... offer more than books. They are places of ... ... for ... Ask at the library ... a library card in your child's name and, if you ... have one, get a car

Libraries offer more than books. They are places of learning
and discovery for everyone. Ask at the library about
getting a library card in your child's name and, if you don't
already have one, get a card for yourself.

The Librarian

Introduce yourself and your child to your librarian.
Librarians can help you to select the best books that are
both fun and suitable for your child's age level. They can
also show you the other programs and services the library
has to offer.

Books . . . and More

In addition to a wealth of books, your library most likely
will have tapes and CDs of books, musical CDs and tapes,
movies, computers that you can use, and many more resources.
You also might find books in languages other than English,
or programs to help adults improve their reading. If you
would like reading help for yourself or your family, check
with the librarian about literacy programs in your
community.

Supervised Story Times

Babies and toddlers.

Many libraries have group story hours that are short and
geared to the attention spans of the children. During story
hour, child sits in your lap, and both of you can join in the
story. The storyteller also may show you fingerplays and
rhythm activities. The storyteller also may give you tips
and handouts that you can use for your own home story
hours.

Preschoolers.

The library may offer these story hours more than once a
week. For these story hours, you and your child usually read
several books on the same topic. You might play games, sing
songs, use puppets, or do other activities that are connected to
that topic. You also may get ideas for books to read and other
things to do with your child at home.

Families.

Families can read together, or they may join in a story told
by the library storyteller.
Some libraries also set up family activities around the
readings, including crafts and art projects and watching
movies.

Summer Reading

After the school year is over, some children may forget what
they have learned about reading. Libraries help keep
children interested in reading by offering summer programs.

Children from early elementary school to high school read
books on their own. A teacher or librarian may give a child
a diary or log in which he writes what he read during the
summer. And, because reading aloud is so important to
promoting a love of reading, many libraries offer "Read-to-
Me" clubs for preschool and younger children.

Article Tags: Story Hours

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